Post 12: Islam in Spain and Scandinavian Countries

In “Islam, Europe’s Second Religion,” Shireen T. Hunter discusses the different means by which the integration of Muslims in Scandinavian countries takes place. There are four main levels in which she discusses. First is the general integration of Muslims. This level is about Islam and Muslims being accepted in a country’s everyday life, yet so … Continue reading Post 12: Islam in Spain and Scandinavian Countries

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Post 11: Muslims in Italy, The United States, and Other European Countries

In “Islam, Europe’s Second Religion” by Shireen Hunter, she discusses several differences in the Muslim community in Italy compared to in other European countries. There are four main developments in the immigrant population in Italy. These include diversity of countries of origin, rapid pace of entry and settlement, higher number of irregular immigrants, and higher … Continue reading Post 11: Muslims in Italy, The United States, and Other European Countries

Post 8: Controversy in Europe

In the book, “Islam, Europe’s Second Religion,” Sami Zemni and Christopher Parker go into detail about what they describe as the “failure of integration.” This is describing the “failure of migrants/immigrants of non-European origin to integrate into host societies” (Parker, 2002). This name is a reflection of two demographic movements that occurred in the last … Continue reading Post 8: Controversy in Europe

Post 7: Myths & Challenges of Muslims

In Justin Vaisse’s post entitled “Muslims in Europe: A Short Introduction,” he discusses some of the myths and issues regarding Muslim’s who live in Europe, mainly France. The first myth Vaisse explains is “being Muslim constitutes a fixed identity, sufficient to fully characterize a person” (Vaisse, 2008). People wrongly think that religion, instead of nationality, … Continue reading Post 7: Myths & Challenges of Muslims

Post 6: The Opposing Views of Easterly & Sachs

All people have different views—and everyone is entitled to their own opinion. In Banerjee & Duflo’s book, Poor Economics, they discuss two opposing views regarding development aid. The first is William Easterly of New York University. Easterly explains that “the real problem of development…is not one of figuring out good policies: It is to sort … Continue reading Post 6: The Opposing Views of Easterly & Sachs

Post 5: The Microfinance Standpoint in Nigeria

According to Kavita Kulkarni, Microfinance is defined as “financial services including credit, savings, insurance, money transfers, etc. targeted at poor and low-income people” (Kulkarni, 2011). Clients are mainly near the poverty line and are primarily women. In Banerjee and Duflo’s book, “Poor Economics,” they discuss microfinance in detail. First, they explain how the poor don’t … Continue reading Post 5: The Microfinance Standpoint in Nigeria

Post 4: Nigeria’s Health, Democracy, and Education

In the article entitled “New Health Care Model Launches in Nigeria to Improve Women and Children’s Health,” The World Bank discusses an idea that will change the health care industry and protect the people of Nigeria’s lives. This is made possible from the investment through Saving One Million Lives, also known as SOML, which is … Continue reading Post 4: Nigeria’s Health, Democracy, and Education

Post 3: Emerging Africa, Nutritional Issues, and Nigeria

In Steven Radelet’s book entitled “Emerging Africa: How 17 Countries are Leading the Way,” he goes into detail about the phrases “cheetah” and “big man,” also known as the cheetah generation and the hippo generation. Ghanaian scholar, George Ayittey describes the cheetah generation as “a new generation of young Africans who look at African issues … Continue reading Post 3: Emerging Africa, Nutritional Issues, and Nigeria